Blender keyboard shortcuts 2.6 mac

How to Use Blender 2.71: Basics

Notice that the background image does not display in a rotated dimensional user view. Press the ZKEY to go to wireframe shading mode. Notice that when we extrude a set of vertices we are actually creating a new set of vertices and moving them in this case along the Y-axis. Press the AKEY to deselect the vertices. Note: Box selecting a group of vertices as we have done above in wireframe mode selects not only the vertices we can see but also the vertices located directly behind thus the whole circle of vertices is selected.

Left click to set the extrusion. Click on the blue translation arrowhead and move the set of vertices down as shown below. Press the ZKEY and go to solid shading mode. Click and drag your middle mouse button to a more dimensional user view. Press the ZKEY to go back to wireframe. The new set of vertices remain selected, so we can continue without having to reselect. Press the ZKEY to enter shaded mode. MMB drag to orbit your view a bit to 3 dimensions. If you are missing some of the faces, it is because you failed to select some of the vertices to extrude.

Make sure click on the file path and name to confirm saving over an already-saved.

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Visit esebinag.tk for weekly blender tutorials! Blender The cheat sheet. Useful Keyboard Shortcuts by Andrew Price. Certain window managers also use the following hotkeys. This key always cancels Blender functions without changes. Mac users may use SHIFT-CMD-Z.

Press the ZKEY to return to wireframe mode. Press the AKEY to deselect any vertices. Press the BKEY and box select the left side set of vertices.

You may want to click your middle mouse button and drag into a 3D view to make sure you have selected the correct vertices. Perform the next 8 extrusions to the left along the Y-axis as shown below. If you have not already done so, press the AKEY to deselect the vertices.

Press your Middle mouse button and drag into a more dimensional user view. Press the ZKEY to return to wireframe shading. Box select BKEY the middle set of vertices as shown below. Note that not all of the vertices in the set are selected. Use the transform widget green arrow to move these vertices to the right along the Y-axis as shown below. Box select BKEY the middle set of vertices on the left as shown below. Press the ZKEY to enter solid shading mode. Middle mouse drag to a more dimensional user view.

Press the ZKEY to enter wireframe display mode. Zoom in on the nose of the submarine. This will merge the selected vertices into one vertex. Press the ZKEY to enter solid shading display mode. Rotate your model to a more dimensional user view. We now need to add a few more elements. Place your 3D cursor in the center of the sub as shown below. In the left 3D Editor viewport tool panel, under Add Cylinder, set the number of vertices to Notice that the tube object is located somewhere inside or below the submarine object.

Use the transform widget blue arrowhead to move the tube object up along the Z-axis. Zoom in a bit. Use the transform widget blue arrowhead to move the object down a bit along the Z-axis. BKEY Box select the top vertices. With the vertices still selected, press the RKEY rotate and rotate the vertices about 45 degrees as shown. EKEY Extrude the vertices a bit more as shown below. With the vertices still selected, press the RKEY rotate and rotate the vertices about 45 more degrees as shown.

ZKEY into solid shading display mode. Zoom in a bit on the rudder area of your submarine. Make sure you are in solid shading display mode and nothing is selected. Place your 3D cursor in the center of the rudder area as shown below. In the right 3D Editor viewport properties panel, set the Y-axis to 90 degrees. TAB into edit mode. Box select the upper vertices and using the transform widget arrowhead, move the vertices up a bit as shown below. Do the same thing with the lower vertices as shown below.

Note that the rudder object may not be in line with the body of the submarine. Rotate you view a bit and focus in on the rudder area as shown below.

Step 2: So...what Buttons/tabs/keys Should I Be Concerned About?

Press TAB to enter object mode. Select the object. Press the ZKEY to enter wireframe shading display mode. Make sure the rudder is positioned in the center of the rudder area. Place your 3D cursor to the side of the submarine as shown below. In the right 3D Editor viewport properties panel set the X Rotation to 90 degrees. TAB into Edit mode. With all of the vertices selected scale the object down a bit more as shown below and press the AKEY to deselect the vertices. Box select BKEY the left set of vertices and using the transform widget green arrowhead move them to the left a bit as shown below.

Press the AKEY and deselect the vertices. Zoom in on the object. Box select BKEY one of the top vertices as shown. Note that since we are in wireframe mode the vertex directly behind the selected vertex is also selected. Box select BKEY the vertices directly opposite of the one you just moved and move them to the center as shown below. Box select BKEY the middle set of vertices as shown and move them to the left a bit as shown below.

TAB into object mode. Note that the center point origin of the object is outside of the object. You can tell this by the location of the transform widget when the object is selected in object mode. We need to recent this center point. This will align the objects origin center point to the center of the object.

Grab GKEY the propeller object and move it to the position as shown below. Rotate your model to a user dimensional view. Make sure the propeller is properly placed. This will turn off the background image. Rotate your model to a user view. We will now do some smoothing operations on our submarine model. Make sure you are in object mode and solid view with nothing selected. Select the submarine object only. Click on the Modifiers context button in the Properties Editor. In the Subsurf modifier panel set the Subdivisions for View and Render to 3. The submarine object is now very smooth and it will render very smooth.

Press the AKEY to deselect the submarine object. Select the periscope object. This will smooth the periscope object. Unity is a very powerful game engine and it has a very intuitive UI to the point where if I'm just fiddling around with it I can generally figure out how to use it. Blender is pretty much the exact opposite. It comes down to cost vs time. Do I want to spend time to configure Blender or do I want to spend money and buy something that has a much more intuitive UI and use something that I can just get started with right away? For my sanity I would choose the latter.

Unity is a very powerful game engine and it has a very intuitive UI Let's not confuse the power of a software package with a powerful UI. Personally, I found that with Blender it's hard to master the basics but easy to learn the advanced stuff, once you have your basics down. With other packages I've used 3d max, Maya, Softimage it may be easy to do a simple scene, but advanced stuff is very unintuitive to the point that you need a tutorial to do anything you haven't done before in that particular package.

How to Use Blender 2.71: Basics

I use vim. JTxt on Oct 17, When did you use it last? Did you watch any video tutorials? What 3d apps do you like? When I started about 15 years ago, Blender was much less intuitive and there was little tutorials and help. It still took many hours over a couple years to become comfortable with Blender.

blender 2.6 keyboard shortcuts

They've since made everything MUCH more discoverable and organized. I've seen and helped young kids get started with it. Ton Roosendaal and others involved with this are awesome. I donated some to see it open sourced, and some since. My best investment ever. Like 4 months ago. Modo and Houdini are cool. IshKebab on Oct 17, In what way is Blender's UI powerful? Blender itself is powerful, yes. But that is in spite of its terrible UI. Most of the controls don't even have useful tooltips.

To be fair, they are improving it slowly but surely. There's been a strong push in the community recently to make the UI more approachable. What makes Blender difficult to learn is that most of its tools are either hidden in an obscure menu or behind a hotkey. This has begun to change in the 2. A couple versions ago the Blender foundation introduced a new tabbed layout where commonly used features are organized and prominently displayed in the properties panel of the 3D viewport.

This was done primarily to ease the learning curve for new users. I'd like to think its the start of a new trend.

Blender 3D: Noob to Pro/Operating System specific notes

That being said, one of the things I like most about blender is that the UI is designed for productivity over usability. Building the user base by decreasing the barrier to entry is a definitely a good thing, but it shouldn't take precedence over the effeciency of the UI. Keyframe on Oct 17, You know what? That damn UI is a real pain. I went through dozens of 3D applications through and through.

I have been using all of these applications in professional capacity over the years and have been very very intimate with them. I gave Blender a shot several times already and have never gone through much of it out of frustration due to UI.

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That's telling something considering all of these apps I've been through over the years - just consider some of the UI catastrophes those had. I understand Blender now has much of capabilities needed in daily production, but that UI I had the same reaction toward blender. But hearing some people criticizing Maya and giving a lot of tasks where Blender is 'better' makes me wonder..

Keyframe on Oct 21, Just saw your comment. HN isn't all that usable. Maya was basically what PowerAnimator was regarding user interface more or less. So it was something we, who used PA, could transition into easily. I've been using it since first beta in I think. It changed the landscape quite a bit. It didn't get much widespread use until version 3 which was the bee's knees. That TDI video is great! Always glad to hear about our young industry's history. I've used it from time to time on odd jobs although only 2 through, I believe 4 - never saw v1.

Lightwave was years ahead in contrast. I will give Blender another chance, maybe over winter break. That's more or less been my experience with every professional-quality tool I've ever used. If you use it regularly, you will eventually memorize everything. If you are a casual user who dabbles once a year, you're going to have to do a lot of googling or bookmark your reference material.

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TheOtherHobbes on Oct 18, The Blender UI fails a number of very basic usability requirements. My issue with it is that the API is so unwieldy. I'm very interested in creating fun things with code, and it's actually easier to do that in some of the pro packages than in Blender. What version are you talking about? Modern blender has a great gui.

  • Step 1: What to Expect;
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  • Step 2: So...what Buttons/tabs/keys Should I Be Concerned About?.
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Joeboy on Oct 17, It's hard to learn but easy to use, which is a perfectly good choice for something intended to be used by professionals. Gimp on the other hand GIMP is something else I have a major problem with but that is a rant for another day I would agree with your Blender rant if it was about Gimp. When did you use Blender? Its UI used to be a complete mess, but since 2. Once you learn the shortcuts or customize them to your own suiting , it's actually really quick to use. I gave up on Blender almost right away when I first used it, but when I came back to it a few years later, I had much more success.

PicassoCT on Oct 18, That is actually quite a freudian-insult to the UI.. And it has to provide instant understandable access to basic features without reading the manual. Every advanced feature can be hidden clicks away , but the basics must be there. If that is not the case and you have to learn the hotkeys or diggest a dozzen tutorials - well then there is no GUI.

It takes a investment to learn for sure, but that has drastically improved over the years. Now you can hit space and search for commands, and most everything is findable in menus, has good tooltips that lists hotkeys TrevorJ on Oct 17, I completely agree the UI is pretty bad. The hidden side of it though is that anything you want to do regularly has excellent keyboard support. I don't even use the UI in blender most of the time and there's little to no friction, it's tremendously efficient.

Problem is, new users have to get past the bad UI to get to that point and many never do. It's much faster to get up and running in Maya, but once you are proficient in Maya, you'll still be doing nearly everything by clicking buttons with the mouse. To me, that's the key difference. I'm not sure any 3d program out there that has a pleasurable UI. I'm certain that blenders UI has things I wish I could do in other software.

A lot of learning is required in 3d. And there are so many customizations to be done in modeling texturing lighting animation. Things have go somewhere. All the commercial packages have UI trouble and their own downsides so its none are worthy to copy UI ideas from where people will be satisfied. It has themes for Windows and Unix. I would say all other 3D programs have a better UI than Blender even 2. Blender just doesn't adhere to common conventions and is inconsitent, has little tooltips, and some function only accessable via shortcuts.

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